DryStoneGarden

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Teardrop Park

TeardropWall1

The day after seeing Four Freedoms Park, I walked along the Hudson River from Battery Park up to the High Line. There are a number of interesting bits of stonework along that stretch of Manhattan including the fort walls at Castle Clinton, the anachronistic Irish Hunger Memorial, and the carefully detailed 911 memorial. I also walked the High Line but its famous plantings were cut back and leafless. It’s a nice site, though, and I enjoyed it even if it wasn’t at it’s horticultural peak. But my favorite spot along the river front was Teardrop Park, a small park with a stone wall about eighteen feet high. Technically the wall is veneer, but it’s built with oversized blocks that make it much cooler than any typical veneer.

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To my surprise, the posted park rules didn’t say anything about prohibiting climbing, so I went up it a few times. It would be too easy with climbing shoes, but in street shoes it was pretty fun.

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The park won an ASLA award a few years ago. The project description called the stone ‘Alcove Blue Stone’; in the Bay Area, the stone’s trade name is Cabernet.

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The diagonal courses of stone are meant to recall geological striations.

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Other areas of the park use the striated stone as well.

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I would have loved this park as a kid, and I heard several different kids cry when they were told it was time to leave.

TeardropSlide

A big slide with rocks to climb to reach the top, you can’t get much better than that. A great little park.

One Response to “Teardrop Park”

  1. July 15th, 2015 at 3:04 am

    James Golden says:

    A park I’ve never visited, though I live in NYC and have heard about it for years. It’s a favorite of a landscape architect friend who lives and works in London. He praises it highly. I must visit it when I get back from England.