DryStoneGarden

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Arizona Flagstone

Clockwise -- Rosa, Sedona Red, Buckskin, Oak, Buff, Peach

Clockwise -- Rosa, Sedona Red, Buckskin, Oak, Buff, Peach

The corollary to the East Coast Connecticut Blue, is our West Coast Arizona flagstone. It’s sort of the ubiquitous, default flagstone of Bay Area gardens, but I’m always happy to use it. It’s easy to work with, and I like the color range, with each of the colors having a slightly different feel. Oak is the hardest; Buckskin and Peach are the nicest to work with; Sedona Red is the lowest quality, the one to avoid.

Arizona Peach Patio at Installation

Arizona Peach Patio at Installation

Peach is probably my favorite, though in the Bay Area it tends to gray over time if it doesn’t get a lot of sunlight and air circulation or if you don’t put a sealer on it. I showed the photo of this patio once before, but here are a couple of more photos. The plants have really filled in around it.

Arizona Peach patio 1 year later

Arizona Peach patio 1 year later

After Three Years

After Three Years

The Pacific Wax Myrtles are eight feet tall now, three years after planting as five gallons. I think they’re going to lose the race with the workers constructing the McMansion next door, but they should provide a good screen fairly soon.

Arizona Peach

Arizona Peach

Last month I went back and built a second patio with the leftover stone and another new pallet of stone. The cinder blocks are new veggie and flower beds that the clients are building. I think the block will eventually get mortared and stucco’ed.

Sedona Red

Sedona Red is by the far the softest, weakest, crumbliest of the Arizona flagstones. My parents house was the only place I’ve ever used it, and I hope to never use it again. Fortunately, the patio is mostly to be seen and is rarely walked on, so there haven’t been problems with cracking. This is a photo of it in its first year; I had some nice photos of it this spring with a ton of crocuses blooming, but those photos were lost when our laptop got stolen. If the crocuses do their thing again next spring, I’ll swap this photo out for a better one.

Sedona Red sideview

Sedona Red sideview

You don’t really want sandstone to be this striated; it’s often a sign of how weekly bonded the layers are. With other Arizona sandstones, the striations are not nearly as distinct.

Buff Sideview

Buff Sideview

I have a few more photos of palleted stone below, similar to what you would find at the stoneyard page, but not so tiny. Actual colors of course vary.

Rosa Peach

Rosa Peach

The stoneyard used to have two different varieties, Peach and a a darker one, McRosa, but both varieties came from the same quarry and I guess it became a nuisance to sort them by color, so now they just sell them as a single variety, Rosa Peach. You can still find lighter and darker pallets if you hunt through the stacks. Usually, though, I pick the pallet based on how thick and solid the pieces are, and sometimes based on the overall geometry of the pieces.

Rosa Peach

Rosa Peach

Buckskin

Buckskin

Buckskin has more yellow than Buff, but they usually look very similar after they’ve been in the ground a while.

Buff

Buff

Oak

Oak

Oak

Oak

Sedona Red

Sedona Red

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6 Responses to “Arizona Flagstone”

  1. August 2nd, 2010 at 1:13 pm

    lostlandscape (James) says:

    There’s a new stoneyard a couple miles away that I’ve been meaning to check out. This’ll give me some things to keep an eye out for. My first reaction is to go gaga over the color of the the red, so thanks for your comments on what a bad choice it is. And I guess I’d never use it anyway because my yard came with what feels like acres of brickwork. That would make the house redder than the surface of Mars.

  2. August 2nd, 2010 at 10:28 pm

    ryan says:

    My mom didn’t want anything pink or yellow. She’s really happy with the Sedona Red, so maybe it’s not so bad. I just can’t get over how soft it was. We have a stone called Mahogany Red that looks really nice beside brick. I built a short section of path with it this spring, but the good photos of it (also with crocuses blooming) also got stolen with our laptop. The stone has a mix of gray and rust tones, really nice.

  3. August 3rd, 2010 at 1:37 am

    Carol says:

    Great post… beautiful stone (colors!!) and your work is stunning. I love seeing the plants growth over the years. Lovely!

  4. August 4th, 2010 at 11:20 am

    Stone Art Blog says:

    Very nice, I like the peach aswell, and the oak. I can see why you are not a fan of the Sedona Red.

  5. December 8th, 2012 at 7:34 am

    Bill Alzos says:

    I need a piece of Peach Arizona Flagstone for a small sidewalk bridge:

    32″ x 44″ x 1.75″

    Do you know how I could get this in Maryland, zip code 21921.

    Thanks,
    Bill

  6. December 8th, 2012 at 9:40 am

    ryan says:

    You could try contacting Lyngso or American Soil and Stone, the two suppliers I use. They might be able to have something special ordered and shipped to you. Good luck.