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Time Lapse Yosemite

People in Yosemite: A TimeLapse Study from Steven M. Bumgardner on Vimeo.

“I’ve lived and worked in National Parks for almost 20 years, and as much as I love landscape photography, I also like looking at the human footprint and the human experience in our national parks.” Bumgardner

This showed up on the Daily Dish just before I left town, so folks might have seen this already, but it merits posting anyways, among other reasons because the rock climbing at 2:30 is on the Stately Pleasure Dome in the Tenaya Lake area, which I posted about last fall. Very cool to see a time lapse of climbs I’ve done. Yosemite must be the most photographed valley in the world, but as far as I’m concerned there can never be too much Yosemite photography. I like that this collection focuses on the multitudes of people in the park, a significant part of the Yosemite experience; if you want to enjoy the valley, you have to come to terms with how many other people want to enjoy it, too.

— Update 7/13 — A recent link I felt like keeping track of, a map of the rock that makes up El Capitan, and more info from the map project.

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4 Responses to “Time Lapse Yosemite”

  1. January 5th, 2010 at 4:29 pm

    Katie/Gardenpunk says:

    That was awesome! Thanks for sharing. It was funny how the people climbing looked like ants.

  2. January 5th, 2010 at 5:04 pm

    how it grows says:

    Neat video!

  3. January 5th, 2010 at 5:48 pm

    Gayle Madwin says:

    I liked this too! The people do seem remarkably like swarming insects when viewed from that distance.

  4. January 5th, 2010 at 10:12 pm

    lostlandscape(James) says:

    The lime-lapse climbers are hilarious. Some of the human segments remind me of the Godfrey Reggio/Philipp Glass film, Koyaanisqatsi. And there’s the semi-recent Mark Klett/Rebecca Solnit/Byron Wolf book, Yosemite in Time, that looks at layers of time in Yosemite using still images that does wonders to give you a sense of human and geological time in the park–highly recommended!