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Posts Tagged ‘manzanita’

When in Doubt…

Manzanita

Manzanita

…post a manzanita photo. I’m still in the mountains, so I don’t know what’s going on down in my garden, but whatever is happening, I’m sure that the trunk of this manzanita is appropriate. Manzanita trunks are great for winter interest, and I’ve decided they’re great for remote-blogging interest, too. This is one of my favorite individual specimens, a manzanita at Tilden. Across the path from it is another great one with peeling bark. Four of them form an arbor. The ones on the right are Arctostaphylos montana-regis and the one on the left is Arctostaphylos pallida, the arcto native to the Oakland-Berkeley hills. So nice.

Manzanita bark

Manzanita bark

And here’s a video about the discovery of the Bay Area manzanita that was thought to be extinct, the Franciscan Manzanita.

Wild Grape Gone Wild

Wild Wild Grape, Vitis californica

A Feral Wild Grape, Vitis californica

A friend of ours has a Wild Grape (Vitis californica) that is truly wild. It’s also entertaining in a “Don’t try this at home, kids!” kind of way, so it has managed to hold onto its spot in the garden. I’ve never planted one and gotta say I’m now a bit skeptical. Not for a small garden, anyways. The foliage is nice, but… 

Ceanothus Dark Star, Manzanita, and dormant Wild Grape

Ceanothus Dark Star, Manzanita, dormant Wild Grape

The planting looks quite nice when the grape is dormant.

Manzanita & Westringia

arctostaphylos howard mcminn & westringia fruticosa

arctostaphylos howard mcminn & westringia fruticosa

Manzanita and westringia is a favorite plant combination for the background of the garden. It’s not a particularly exciting combo, but you can’t have every plant in the garden be a show-stopper and they bloom at the same time, in February when blooms are at a premium. The mounding form and small leaves have a nice, soft texture that works as the hard evergreen backbone; almost anything colorful or strong or dark or bold (for instance, the phormium ad nauseum in this photo) looks good in front of them.

ryan 3/1